• Title/Summary/Keyword: Cladding Embrittlement

Search Result 4, Processing Time 0.082 seconds

The effect of peak cladding temperature occurring during interim-dry storage on transport-induced cladding embrittlement

  • Kim, Kyu-Tae
    • Nuclear Engineering and Technology
    • /
    • v.52 no.7
    • /
    • pp.1486-1494
    • /
    • 2020
  • To evaluate transport-induced cladding embrittlement after interim-dry storage, ring compression tests were carried out at room temperature(RT) and 135 ℃. The ring compression test specimens were prepared by simulating the interim-dry storage conditions that include four peak cladding temperatures of 250, 300, 350 and 400 ℃, two tensile hoop stresses of 80 and 100 MPa, two hydrogen contents of 250 and 500 wt.ppm-H and a cooling rate of 0.3 ℃/min. Radial hydride fractions of the ring specimens vary depending on those interim-dry storage conditions. The RT compression tests generated lower offset strains than the 135 ℃ ones. In addition, the RT and 135 ℃ compression tests indicate that a higher peak cladding temperature, a higher tensile hoop stress and the lower hydrogen content generated a lower offset strain. Based on the embrittlement criterion of 2.0% offset strain, an allowable peak temperature during the interim-dry storage may be proposed to be less than 350 ℃ under the tensile hoop stress of 80 MPa at the terminal cool-down temperature of 135 ℃.

FUEL BEHAVIOR UNDER LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACCIDENT SITUATIONS

  • CHUNG HEE M.
    • Nuclear Engineering and Technology
    • /
    • v.37 no.4
    • /
    • pp.327-362
    • /
    • 2005
  • The design, construction, and operation of a light water reactor (LWR) are subject to compliance with safety criteria specified for accident situations, such as loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). Because reactor fuel is the primary source of radioactivity and heat generation, such a criterion is established on the basis of the characteristics and performance of fuel under the specific accident condition. As such, fuel behavior under accident situations impact many aspects of fuel design and power generation, and in an indirect manner, even spent fuel storage and management. This paper provides a comprehensive review of: the history of the current LOCA criteria, results of LOCA-related investigations on conventional and new classes of fuel, and status of on-going studies on high-burnup fuel under LOCA situations. The objective of the paper is to provide a better understanding of important issues and an insight helpful to establish new LOCA criteria for modem LWR fuels.

FALCON code-based analysis of PWR fuel rod behaviour during RIA transients versus new U.S.NRC and current Swiss failure limits

  • Khvostov, G.;Gorzel, A.
    • Nuclear Engineering and Technology
    • /
    • v.53 no.11
    • /
    • pp.3741-3758
    • /
    • 2021
  • Outcomes of the FALCON code analysis-related part of the STARS-ENSI Service Project on Evaluation of the new U.S.NRC RIA Fuel Safety Criteria and Application to the Swiss Reactors are presented. Substantial conservatism of the updated safety limits for high-temperature and PCMI cladding failure, as proposed in the NRC Regulatory Guide RG 1.236, is confirmed. Applicability of the updated failure limits to fuel safety analysis in the Swiss PWRs, as applied to standard fuel designs using UO2 fuel pellets and SRA Zry-4 as cladding materials is discussed. Conducting of new integral RIA tests with irradiated samples using doped- and gadolinia fuel pellets to support appropriate fuel safety criteria for RIA events is recommended.

Investigation of a best oxidation model and thermal margin analysis at high temperature under design extension conditions using SPACE

  • Lee, Dongkyu;No, Hee Cheon;Kim, Bokyung
    • Nuclear Engineering and Technology
    • /
    • v.52 no.4
    • /
    • pp.742-754
    • /
    • 2020
  • Zircaloy cladding oxidation is an important phenomenon for both design basis accident and severe accidents, because it results in cladding embrittlement and rapid fuel temperature escalation. For this reason during the last decade, many experts have been conducting experiments to identify the oxidation phenomena that occur under design basis accidents and to develop mathematical analysis models. However, since the study of design extension conditions (DEC) is relatively insufficient, it is essential to develop and validate a physical and mathematical model simulating the oxidation of the cladding material at high temperatures. In this study, the QUENCH-05 and -06 experiments were utilized to develop the best-fitted oxidation model and to validate the SPACE code modified with it under the design extension condition. It is found out that the cladding temperature and oxidation thickness predicted by the Cathcart-Pawel oxidation model at low temperature (T < 1853 K) and Urbanic-Heidrick at high temperature (T > 1853 K) were in excellent agreement with the data of the QUENCH experiments. For 'LOCA without SI' (Safety Injection) accidents, which should be considered in design extension conditions, it has been performed the evaluation of the operator action time to prevent core melting for the APR1400 plant using the modified SPACE. For the 'LBLOCA without SI' and 'SBLOCA without SI' accidents, it has been performed that sensitivity analysis for the operator action time in terms of the number of SIT (Safety Injection Tank), the recovery number of the SIP (Safety Injection Pump), and the break sizes for the SBLOCA. Also, with the extended acceptance criteria, it has been evaluated the available operator action time margin and the power margin. It is confirmed that the power can be enabled to uprate about 12% through best-estimate calculations.