• Title/Summary/Keyword: A. Rodchenko

Search Result 3, Processing Time 0.043 seconds

A Study on the Costume of Arts in the Russian Constructivism - Focused on Tatlin, Rodchenko, Stepanova & Popova - (러시아 구성주의(Constructivism) 예술의상 연구 - Tatlin, Rodchenko, Stepanova와 Popova를 중심으로 -)

  • Park, Yoon-Jeong
    • The Research Journal of the Costume Culture
    • /
    • v.18 no.3
    • /
    • pp.550-558
    • /
    • 2010
  • Russian Constructivism, which took the lead in the Russian trend of art until the late 1920's, was influenced by European Cubism and Futurism. Breaking away from the previous realistic tendency, Russian Constructivism, to meet the ideology of the revolution, insisted the "Art into Street" and the "Art in Industry" with its abstract and geometric design. Russian Constructivism effected paintings of mid 1920's, as well as Industrial design and costume design. This operated remarkable changes in Russian form of costume and textile area. An unusual situation like revolution had provided the social justification to develop a new costume design not for the special class of people, but for the general public. In this atmosphere, the plan of clothing mass production began to progress. Although the Russian Constructivism costume of arts shows the similarity in the trend of fashion and the physical forms of those days, its fundamental idea in manufacturing costumes was 'to create costumes to be possible to mass-produce and to be wearable to anyone regardless of the social class'. Therefore, Constructivism costume of arts pursued dynamism and geometric form through non-objective design that has broken away from the handcrafted and traditional standards of the past. These distinct characteristics served as a momentum to seek costume design based on productivity and functionality.

A Study on the Costume Designs of Arts in the Italian & Russian Avant-Garde - Focused on Futurism and Constructivism - (이탈리아와 러시아 전위(Avant-Garde) 예술의상 디자인 연구 - 미래주의(Futurism)와 구성주의(Constructivism)를 중심으로 -)

  • Park, Yoon-Jeong
    • The Research Journal of the Costume Culture
    • /
    • v.19 no.1
    • /
    • pp.128-149
    • /
    • 2011
  • This study dealing with the Italian futurist and Russian constructivist costume designs which aimed for new fashion design freed from the conventional meanings of fashion and explore the artistic purpose reflected within the designs expressed differently according to cultural and regional differences in order examine the early 20th century Avant-grade costume designs. The scope of this study is limited to the 1910s to the 1930s when the Italian futurism and the Russian constructivism were originated and were most active. This monograph focused on the works of the Italian futurists, Giacomo Balla who declared the 'Manifesto delle moda minile futurista', Fortunato Depero, and Thayaht who suggested a new direction for the futurist, and on the works of the Russian constructivists Alexander Rodchenko, Varvara Stepanova and Liubov Popova. As an one method of investigated, this paper is used materials of various sources to examine their features. Futurists costume designs expressed a radical conception of progress and their source of aesthetics was dynamism. The concept of 'power' which was the basis of the futurists was incorporated in the costumes while non-symmetrical cut-outs and bright and vivid colors completed the futurist costume designs. Moreover the Russian constructivists brought advances in the field of fabric and textile designs. What was particularly interesting about the Russian constructivist costumes was that the artists worked at the textile mills themselves, directly involved in the designs and manufacturing of fabric, developing an advancement in textile and a new understanding of costume. Furthermore, many Russian artists settled in Paris, actively participating in the fashion industry, and therefore, they have greatly contributed to the development of the early 20th century Avant-garde costume designs.

The Question of 'State and Art' with regard to Soviet Socialist Realism (소련 사회주의 리얼리즘에 관하여: '국민과 예술'의 문제)

  • Alexander, Morozov
    • The Journal of Art Theory & Practice
    • /
    • no.7
    • /
    • pp.125-163
    • /
    • 2009
  • The artworks of Socialist Realism of the former Soviet Union, with the beginning of the 21st century, are gaining a new attention from art collectors. One reason for this might consist in the fact that relevant art pieces exemplify the ways in which they visualize ideas on the basis of their high-profile art tradition and also in which they integrate their utopian ideals with mysticism. These aspects of the Soviet art goes far beyond the wide-spread assumption that their art, as a means of propaganda, principally represents a political allegiance to the system. With Stalin coming into power in the 1930s, the artistic trend of Socialist Realism obtained a nationwide sympathy and support from people, giving birth to a new art which essentially corresponded to the demands of the political power. An official art current of the USSR over the period from the 1930s to 1950s, Socialist Realism was in tandem with the Communist commitment to the party and popularity, symbolizing a loyalty to the cause. It was thus characterized by plainness and lucidity so that ordinary people could gain easy access to art. Its salient feature, over an entire range of art, was an optimistic pursuit of a utopian dream. Therefore, it tallied with the popular sentiment for a Communist paradise, giving form to their beliefs in human agency working at the materialist world and also to such abstract concepts as force, fitness, and beauty by adding even mythical ideals. Its main subject matter includes harvest feasts of collective farms, imaginary socialist cities, grand marches of heroic laborers and in this way it served as a propaganda for a sacred utopia of socialist totalitarianism. On the other end of the spectrum, however, rose the second camp of art, which put an emphasis on bona-fide artistic activities of plastic art and on an artist's personal expression and freedom, as opposed to the surface optimism of Socialist Realism. Central to the Russian Avant Garde art, which prized the above-mentioned values, were Malevich's Geometric Abstraction and A. Rodchenko's Constructivism. Furthermore, in the transitional era of the late 20th century and the 21st century it was recognized that film art or electronic media art, rather than traditional genre of paintings, would function as a more efficient way of propaganda. These new genres were made possible by ridiculing the stereotypes of the Russian lifestyle and also by ignoring ethical or professional dimensions of artworks. That is, they reinvented themselves into a sort of field art, seemingly degrading the quality of artworks and transforming them into artifacts or simulacres in the very sense of post-modernism. The advent of the new era brought about the formation and occupation of pop culture of the younger generations, calling into question the idea of art as the class-determined. It also increased the attention to field art, which extensively found way to modern art centers, galleries, and exhibition projects. It can be stated that this was a natural outcome of human nature.

  • PDF