• Title/Summary/Keyword: post-colonial history

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The Dehistoricization Trend in Historical Plays: Play with History and Everyday Life History Writing (역사극의 탈역사화 경향: 역사의 유희와 일상사적 역사 쓰기)

  • Kim, Sunghee
    • Journal of Korean Theatre Studies Association
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    • no.48
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    • pp.51-84
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    • 2012
  • In Korea, historical plays took an epoch-making turn from the previous historical plays in terms of approaches to topic and material and methods of rewriting history in the 1990s. Historical plays became dehistoricized with individual, everyday life, and faction emerging as major codes of historical plays according to mistrust in history and grand narrative as the original and disappearance of trust in the growth and totality of history. A new trend became dominant of presenting fictionality prominent instead of reproduction of history and freely playing with history outside the context. While modern historical plays were subject to the content of history, post-modern historical plays sought after new history writing to tell a new story on history within a framework of fiction. Focusing on some of the trends in post-modern historical plays since the 1990s, which include play with history, daily life-style history writing, and reproduction patterns of colonial modernity, this study examined the goals, representations, and text strategies of new history writing in three historical plays, Generation After Generation(2000) by Park Geunhyung, The Mercenaries(2000) by Park Sujin, and Chosun Detective Hong Yunshik(2007) by Sung Giwoong. In Generation After Generation, the author adopts a plot of starting with the present and tracing back to the past, breaking down the myth of racially homogeneous nation. At the same time, he discloses that the colonial history is not just by the oppressive force of Japan but also by the voluntary cooperation of Korean people. That is, we are also accountable for the colonial history of the nation. The Mercenaries contrasts the independence movement during the colonial period against the modern history developed after Liberation, thus highlighting the still continuing coloniality, namely post-colonial present. The past is presented as the "phantom of history" making its appearance according to the request of the present hoping for salvation. The author politicizes history and grants political wishes to history by summoning the history by personal memories such as fictional diaries and letters with Messiah-like images opposed to the present of collapse and catastrophe. In Chosun Detective Hong Yunshik, the author makes an attempt at the microscopic reproduction of daily life by approaching the 1930s as the modern period when capitalist daily life started to take root. The lists of signs comprising daily life in colonial Gyeongseong are divided between civilization and savagery and between modern and premodern. With the progress of narrative, however, they become mixed together and reversed in the representation system in which the latter overwhelms the former.

"This long heritage" : Byun Sang-hun (변상훈) and the Transformation of Korean Traditional Medicine (hanŭihak / 한의학), under the USAMGIK (United States Army Military Government in Korea (mikǔnjǒng / 미군정), 1945~1948

  • DiMoia, John
    • The Journal of Korean Medical History
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    • v.22 no.2
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    • pp.67-98
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    • 2009
  • This paper initiates an effort to look at "South Korean" medicine as perhaps distinct from "Korean" medicine, focusing specifically on the possibility of offering a post-colonial history of medicine. As such, the paper looks at the formation of the NMC (National Medical Center) in Seoul in 1958 (1958-1963, 1963-1968, 1968-1971) by a consortium of European actors--Denmark, Sweden, and Norway--invested in developing new forms of international assistance after the Korean War. Rather than take a firm stance, the paper ultimately suggests that the role of these actors in formative South Korean institutions was constitutive, and perhaps requires much more examination in the future.

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Epic Design : Local Design in Globalization Era - based on Restaurant Style - (서사적 디자인의 발현(I) - 레스토랑 양식을 통해 본 세계화 시대의 지역 디자인 -)

  • Jo, Hyun-Shin
    • Archives of design research
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    • v.19 no.1 s.63
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    • pp.243-252
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    • 2006
  • This essay studies local design style in globalization era through investigation of the restaurants which are located at suburb of big cities in Korea. All regional memory and history is disappeared in 'The world time' and world design style in globalization era. Thus to study local design means to study the history of certain region and the memory of the people who lives in that area and how they represent their past and memory. Post colonial theory, everyday aesthetics and the way of using past and memory are preresearched for the theoretical background. Post colonial theory is discourse for the countries which have the experience of colonialism. History and memory are used for defining present political, social, economical and cultural situation. In this essay, the way using past and memory were classified in three dimension - by government, company, and individuals. The past which is represented by government is conceptual and defined as only sign without on going history. When it is represented by company, it is also uses as a sign and imitation without contextual meaning. However, when the past is used by individuals, it is alive in daily life. This essay argues that those restaurants which have the style of 'the Koreaness' symbolize the suppressed desire to represent the lost past and memory which are forced to be exduded during the colonial period and fast modern development. And the design style can be defined as epic design, for it has it's own main character, story, memory and plot too. This word 'epic' imply the main point of local design style. In conclusion, this essay will ask the role of design in the country which has colonial memory in globalization era.

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A Post-Colonial Significance of the Mimicry and Translation in The Host (탈식민주의 관점에서 본 [괴물]의 영화적 모방과 번역의 의미)

  • Seo, In-Sook
    • The Journal of the Korea Contents Association
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    • v.11 no.2
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    • pp.204-214
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    • 2011
  • This article attenpts to analyze, from the perspective of post-colonialism, 'Goemul'(English title, The Host), the Korean blockbuster movie that scored the greatest box-office success in the history of the Korean cinema. As Goemul eagerly copies the monster movie, a representative genre of Hollywood movies, it has close affinity with Hollywood blockbuster movie in many repects. At the same time, however, it also contains a resistance discourse that criticizes and mocks colonial of Korean society under American influences. This movie successfully carries out a post-colonial cultural translation that transforms mimicry into resistance to colonialsim. Hence, this artcle focuses on how Goemul borrows many aspects of the Hollywood monster movie but goes beyond the simple copying of it to reach post-colonial signification subverting the existing cultural regime.

Rethinking Korean Women's Art from a Post-territorial Perspective: Focusing on Korean-Japanese third generation women artists' experience of diaspora and an interpretation of their work (탈영토적 시각에서 볼 수 있는 한국여성미술의 비평적 가능성 : 재일동포3세 여성화가의 '디아스포라'의 경험과 작품해석을 중심으로)

  • Suh, Heejung
    • The Journal of Art Theory & Practice
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    • no.14
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    • pp.125-158
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    • 2012
  • After liberation from Japanese colonial rule in 1945, there was the three-year period of United States Army Military Government in Korea. In 1948, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, and Republic of Korea were established in the north and south of the Korean Peninsula. The Republic of Korea is now a modern state set in the southern part of the Korean. We usually refer to Koreans as people who belong to the Republic of Korea. Can we say that is true exactly? Why make of this an obsolete question? The period from 1945 when Korea was emancipated from Japanese colonial rule to 1948 when the Republic of Korea was established has not been a focus of modern Korean history. This three years remains empty in Korean history and makes the concept of 'Korean' we usually consider ambiguous, and prompts careful attention to the silence of 'some Koreans' forced to live against their will in the blurred boundaries between nation and people. This dissertation regards 'Koreans' who came to live in the border of nations, especially 'Korean-Japanese third generation women artists'who are marginalized both Japan and Korea. It questions the category of 'Korean women's art' that has so far been considered, based on the concept of territory, and presents a new perspective for viewing 'Korean women's art'. Almost no study on Korean-Japanese women's art has been conducted, based on research on Korean diaspora, and no systematic historical records exist. Even data-collection is limited due to the political situation of South and North in confrontation. Representation of the Mother Country on the Artworks by First and Second-Generation Korean-Japanese(Zainich) Women Artists after Liberation since 1945 was published in 2011 is the only dissertation in which Korean-Japanese women artists, and early artistic activities. That research is based on press releases and interviews obtained through Japan. This thesis concentrates on the world of Korean-Japanese third generation women artists such as Kim Jung-sook, Kim Ae-soon, and Han Sung-nam, permanent residents in Japan who still have Korean nationality. The three Korean-Japanese third generation women artists whose art world is reviewed in this thesis would like to reveal their voices as minorities in Japan and Korea, resisting power and the universal concepts of nation, people and identity. Questioning the general notions of 'Korean women' and 'Korean women's art'considered within the Korean Peninsula, they explore their identity as Korean women outside the Korean territory from a post-territorial perspective and have a new understanding of the minority's diversity and difference through their eyes as marginal women living outside the mainstream of Korean and Japanese society. This is associated with recent post-colonial critical viewpoints reconsidering myths of universalism and transcendental aesthetic measures. In the 1980s and 1990s art museums and galleries in New York tried a critical shift in aesthetic discourse on contemporary art history, analyzed how power relationships among such elements as gender, sexuality, race, nationalism. Ghost of Ethnicity: Rethinking Art Discourses of the 1940s and 1980s by Lisa Bloom is an obvious presentation about the post-colonial discourse. Lisa Bloom rethinks the diversity of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender each artist and critic has, she began a new discussion on artists who were anti-establishment artists alienated by mainstream society. As migration rapidly increased through globalism lead by the United States the aspects of diaspora experience emerges as critical issues in interpreting contemporary culture. As a new concept of art with hybrid cultural backgrounds exists, each artist's cultural identity and specificity should be viewed and interpreted in a sociopolitical context. A criticism started considering the distinct characteristics of each individual's historical experience and cultural identity, and paying attention to experience of the third world artist, especially women artists, confronting the power of modernist discourses from a perspective of the white male subject. Considering recent international contemporary art, the Korean-Japanese third generation women artists who clarify their cultural identity as minority living in the border between Korea and Japan may present a new direction for contemporary Korean art. Their art world derives from their diaspora experience on colonial trauma historically. Their works made us to see that it is also associated with postcolonial critical perspective in the recent contemporary art stream. And it reminds us of rethinking the diversity of the minority living outside mainstream society. Thus, this should be considered as one of the features in the context of Korean women's art.

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A Study of Women's Health and Disease through Advertisements in Dong-a Newspaper between 1920 and 1945 (1920년~1945년까지의 동아일보 광고를 통해 본 여성의 건강과 질병)

  • Park, Gyu-Ri;Baek, Kyu-Hwan;Jung, Ji-Hun;Lee, Sang-Jae
    • The Journal of Korean Medical History
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    • v.28 no.2
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    • pp.87-96
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    • 2015
  • In this study, we investigated advertisements in Dong-a newspaper about gynecological drugs between 1920 and 1945 and analyzed the awareness of women's health and disease during the Japanese Colonial Rule. The advertisements included leukorrhea, oligomenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, feeling of cold, sterility, hysteria, and sexually transmitted infection and identified inattentive menstruation, improper intercourse, poor pre- and post-natal care as the cause for illness. This study includes the following limitations; it only analysed advertisements from Dong-a newspaper, and most of the drugs were manufactured in Japan and might not accurately reflect the health and disease of Korean women. Suggested future studies may include analysis of institute magazine and Japanese news advertisements during this period.

The 1965 Korea-Japan Treaty on Basic Relations: A New Perspective on the Normalization Process (1965년 한일기본조약 : 국교정상화 요인에 대한 새로운 해석)

  • Moon, William J.;Oh, Hyun-Seung
    • Journal of the military operations research society of Korea
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    • v.33 no.1
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    • pp.43-58
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    • 2007
  • With every Yasukuni Shrine visit by a Japanese Prime Minister, one can expect that the Korean government will jump up and down to condemn Japan. The blatant antagonism between the two powerhouses in Asia, lingering around more than sixty years after the end of the colonial period, is unmistakably more than interplay of their colonial history. It is an illumination of a largely unsettled post-colonial diplomacy that was executed in the name of economic advancement. The purpose of this paper is to shed lights on a largely ignored subject matter that unambiguously shaped the peculiar relationship between Korea and Japan.

Aboriginal Community Archives in Australia and Current Meaning of "Parallel Provenance" (호주 원주민 공동체 아카이브와 '평행출처주의'의 현재적 의미)

  • Lee, Kyong Rae
    • The Korean Journal of Archival Studies
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    • no.40
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    • pp.29-60
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    • 2014
  • The purpose of this study is to trace the formation process of "parallel provenance" concept in the context of Australia's aboriginal community archives development and draw its implications for contemporary rebuilding of domestic "past affairs-related committee archives". Focused on historical development of aboriginal community archives in Australia, this writing divides its development into three periods: colonial archives, post-colonial archives, and contemporary archives and investigates each period's distinct features in managing and building of aboriginal community archives. First of all, for colonial archives, it pays attention to Australia's archival tradition, which focused on current record-keeping and then development of multiple provenance resulted from this tradition. Second, for post-colonial archives, it examines the appearance of aboriginal people as the subject of documentation category and name indexing on them. Finally, for contemporary archives, it analyzes current activities of Australia's academic world of archival science for overcoming "the otherness" of aboriginal people through conceptualization of "parallel provenance". Conclusively, through current meaning of parallel provenance, this study draws implications for democratic contemporary rebuilding of domestic past affairs-related committee archives, in which historical victims become the subject of archives.

Rethinking the Records of the Japan's Korean Colonial Rule and the Post-War Compensation : Focusing on the Dual Decision Making System and the Sources of the Documents (제국의 식민지·점령지 지배와 '전후보상' 기록의 재인식 조선의 식민지지배·보상처리 결재구조와 원본출처를 중심으로)

  • Kim, Kyung-Nam
    • The Korean Journal of Archival Studies
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    • no.39
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    • pp.281-318
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    • 2014
  • This article aims to inquire into the decision making system and the sources of the original documents made by means of it in Imperial Japan, the colonial Chosun, GHQ, and the occupied Japan in terms of the post-war treatments of compensation on the Japanese colonial rules. It deals with them from 1910 to 1952 in the perspective of history and archivistics. This article attempts to establish the foundation on which the perception of the documents made in the Imperial Japan, its colony, and the occupied territory would be widened by placing the colonial rules and the compensation on them into a continuous line. The records of Japan's forced occupation of Korea during 1910-1945, and the original records documenting the decision making process of post-war compensation under GHQ, 1945-1952, have been dispersed in Korea, Japan and the United States. This dispersed preservation was mainly due to the complicated decision-making process among Governor-General of Chosun, the Japanese Imperial government, and the GHQ. It was the top-down styled, dual decision making system, in which the critical policies, personnel, and budget had been decided in Imperial homeland, while their implementations were made in the colonies. As a result, the records documenting the whole process of domination have been preserved dispersedly in Japan and its colonies. In particular, the accounts of not yet paid Korean workers that was forced to mobilize in Japan's colonial periods, which is emerging as the diplomatic conflict between Korea and Japan, had been dealt in the decrees of the Japanese government and policy-making of GHQ. It has already been changed to the problem as 'economic cooperation' from the 'debt'. Also, the critical records for post-war compensation were preserved dispersedly in the United States and Japan under the top-down decision making process of GHQ-Japan. Therefore, the dispersed records of 1910-1952 about the colonial rules by the Imperial Japan and the post-war compensation on them must be re-investigated for the adequate documentation in the context of time and space.

The Rise of the Novel and the Sexual Contract: Beyond correspondence between novel and nation-state (소설의 발생과 성적 계약 -국민국가 담론을 넘어)

  • Kim, Bongyoul
    • Journal of English Language & Literature
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    • v.55 no.5
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    • pp.793-820
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    • 2009
  • The studies of correspondence between novel and nation-state, among which The Rise of the Novel by Ian Watt is supposed to be the first book, have flourished for more than twenty years, encouraged by Benedict Anderson's and Cathy Davidson's works. According to them, the novel should come simultaneously with, or after the foundation of the nation-state, and testify to its production or the emergence of its subject/citizen. This paper questions about these prepositions, trying to introduce a new paradigmatical approach, "between global and transnational historical approach," to first novels in transatlantic areas including England and atlantic coastal areas. In its complex relation to a variety of colonial, post-colonial, and transnational geopolitics, various cultural practices such as history, traveler's tales and epistolary novels can be included in the genre of the novel. The idea of the sexual contract by Carole Pateman is very useful because it helps more clearly understand the nature of relation between men and women in the capitalist reproduction, while the social contract tells about the relation between men as citizens. Unlike Freud in Totem and Taboo, Zilboorg argues that there were primordial and violent scenes such as rape before the first sexual contract. This paper will illuminate that "the rise of the novel" corresponded with the emergence of the sexual contract. In the so-called first novel Pamela, the heroine Pamela was threatened to be violated by Mr. B., and was really even confined in his cottage. Mary Rowlandson's The Captive Narrative shows that her body was confined as an English female captive, and troubled with imaginary rape by Indians which resulted in the unequal sexual contract between her and her puritan community in America. However, Leonora Sansay's Secret History in an alternative communality, which was not a nation-state, was different from both novels mentioned above, in that it shows the possibility of emancipation from their unequal marriage, the sexual contract. Therefore, it can be argued that "between global and transnational historical approach" has a possibility to provide a new vision of global sisterhood and solidarity to recognize globalized women's violence, and free themselves from the unequal sexual contract.