• Title/Summary/Keyword: Johns Hopkins University

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Wavelet-based detection and classification of roof-corner pressure transients

  • Pettit, Chris L.;Jones, Nicholas P.;Ghanem, Roger
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.3 no.3
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    • pp.159-175
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    • 2000
  • Many practical time series, including pressure signals measured on roof-corners of low-rise buildings in quartering winds, consist of relatively quiescent periods interrupted by intermittent transients. The dyadic wavelet transform is used to detect these transients in pressure time series and a relatively simple pattern classification scheme is used to detect underlying structure in these transients. Statistical analysis of the resulting pattern classes yields a library of signal "building blocks", which are useful for detailed characterization of transients inherent to the signals being analyzed.

Employers' Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence among a Diverse Workforce

  • Samuel, Laura J.;Tudor, Carrie;Weinstein, Marc;Moss, Helen;Glass, Nancy
    • Safety and Health at Work
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    • v.2 no.3
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    • pp.250-259
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    • 2011
  • Objectives: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant global public health concern, affecting 5.3 million US individuals annually. An estimated 1 in 3 women globally are abused by an intimate partner in their lifetime, and the effects carry over into the workplace. This article examines employers' perceptions of IPV in the workplace, targeting supervisors of Latina employees. Methods: Fourteen employers and supervisors of small service-sector companies in Oregon were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Interpretive description was used to identify themes. These qualitative interviews preceded and helped to formulate a larger workplace intervention study. Results: The following themes were found and are detailed: (1) factors associated with recognizing IPV in the workplace, (2) effects of IPV on the work environment and (3) supervisors' responses to IPV-active vs. passive involvement. Also, supervisors' suggestions for addressing IPV in the workplace are summarized. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the need for more IPV-related resources in the workplace to be available to supervisors as well as survivors and their coworkers. The needs of supervisors and workplaces vary by site, demonstrating the need for tailored interventions, and culturally appropriate workplace interventions are needed for Latinas and other racially and ethnically diverse populations.

Poly (ADP-ribose) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

  • Lee, Yunjong;Kang, Ho Chul;Lee, Byoung Dae;Lee, Yun-Il;Kim, Young Pil;Shin, Joo-Ho
    • BMB Reports
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    • v.47 no.8
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    • pp.424-432
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    • 2014
  • The defining feature of Parkinson's disease is a progressive and selective demise of dopaminergic neurons. A recent report on Parkinson's disease animal model demonstrates that poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) dependent cell death, also named parthanatos, is accountable for selective dopaminergic neuronal loss. Parthanatos is a programmed necrotic cell death, characterized by PARP1 activation, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation, and large scale DNA fragmentation. Besides cell death regulation via interaction with AIF, PAR molecule mediates diverse cellular processes including genomic stability, cell division, transcription, epigenetic regulation, and stress granule formation. In this review, we will discuss the roles of PARP1 activation and PAR molecules in the pathological processes of Parkinson's disease. Potential interaction between PAR molecule and Parkinson's disease protein interactome are briefly introduced. Finally, we suggest promising points of therapeutic intervention in the pathological PAR signaling cascade to halt progression in Parkinson's disease.

Down the Rabbit Hole-Considerations for Ingested Foreign Bodies

  • Brown, Jerry;Kidder, Molly;Fabbrini, Abigail;deVries, Jonathan;Robertson, Jason;Chandler, Nicole;Wilsey, Michael
    • Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition
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    • v.22 no.6
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    • pp.619-623
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    • 2019
  • We report the case of a seven-year-old boy with an ingested foreign body, which was retained within the appendix for a known duration of ten months, ultimately requiring appendectomy. The ingested foreign body was incidentally discovered by abdominal x-ray at an emergency room visit for constipation. Despite four bowel cleanouts, subsequent x-rays showed persistence of the foreign body in the right lower quadrant. While the patient did not have signs or symptoms of acute appendicitis, laparoscopic appendectomy was performed due to the risk of this foreign body causing appendicitis in the future. A small metallic object was found within the appendix upon removal. This case highlights the unique challenge presented by foreign body ingestions in non-verbal or developmentally challenged children and the importance of further diagnostic workup when concerns arise for potential retained foreign bodies.

Gastric Xanthoma in the Pediatric Population: A Possible Herald for Malignancy?

  • Russell, Joseph D.;Peck, Jacquelin;Phen, Claudia;Linehan, Janna L.;Karjoo, Sara;Nguyen, Johnny;Wilsey, Michael J.
    • Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition
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    • v.23 no.1
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    • pp.110-114
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    • 2020
  • Gastric xanthoma is frequently an incidental finding on upper endoscopy in adults. Gastric xanthomas (GX) can be mistaken for malignancies and warrant prompt histologic diagnosis. The underlying etiology is not fully understood; however, it has been linked to Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric cancer. GX in the pediatric population is largely unreported in the literature. Because of the relative rarity, documentation with case reports are essential to provide as much data as possible to see if there is a correlation between GX and malignant potential in the pediatric population. Our group is reporting two cases, a 10-year-old male and a 7-year-old male, both who presented with chronic dysphagia, upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite. Upper endoscopies for both patients revealed small polypoid lesions located in the antrum with foamy histiocytes on histology, leading to the diagnosis of gastric xanthoma.

Endoscopic Balloon Dilation for Treatment of Congenital Antral Web

  • Peck, Jacquelin;Khalaf, Racha;Marth, Ryan;Phen, Claudia;Sosa, Roberto;Cordero, Francisco Balsells;Wilsey, Michael
    • Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition
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    • v.21 no.4
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    • pp.351-354
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    • 2018
  • Congenital antral webs are a rare but relevant cause of gastric outlet obstruction in infants and children. The condition may lead to feeding refusal, vomiting, and poor growth. Due to the relative rarity of the disease, cases of congenital antral web are frequently misdiagnosed or diagnosed with significant delay as physicians favorably pursue diagnoses of pyloric stenosis and gastric ulcer disease, which are more prevalent. We report a case of an eight-month-old female who presented with persistent non-bilious emesis, feeding difficulties, and failure to thrive and was discovered to have an antral web. The web was successfully treated with endoscopic balloon dilation, which resolved her symptoms. Two years later, the patient remains asymptomatic and is thriving with weight at the 75th percentile for her age.