• Title/Summary/Keyword: Johns Hopkins University

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Development of a robust bench-scale testing unit for low-pressure membranes used in water treatment

  • Huang, Haiou;Schwab, Kellogg;Jacangelo, Joseph G.
    • Membrane and Water Treatment
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    • v.2 no.2
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    • pp.121-136
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    • 2011
  • A bench-scale test has recently been proposed as a predictive tool to minimize the scope of pilot-scale testing or to optimize the operation of full-scale membrane filtration systems. Consequently, a bench-scale testing unit was developed for this purpose and systematically evaluated in this study. This unit was capable of accommodating commercially available, low pressure, hollow fiber (LPHF) membranes with various configurations for testing under conditions comparable to real-world applications. Reproducibility of this unit in assessing membrane fouling and microbial removal efficiency of LPHF membranes was tested and statistically comparable results were obtained. This unit serves as a useful apparatus for academic researchers and utilities to evaluate the performance of LPHF membranes used for water treatment.

Wavelet-based detection and classification of roof-corner pressure transients

  • Pettit, Chris L.;Jones, Nicholas P.;Ghanem, Roger
    • Wind and Structures
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    • v.3 no.3
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    • pp.159-175
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    • 2000
  • Many practical time series, including pressure signals measured on roof-corners of low-rise buildings in quartering winds, consist of relatively quiescent periods interrupted by intermittent transients. The dyadic wavelet transform is used to detect these transients in pressure time series and a relatively simple pattern classification scheme is used to detect underlying structure in these transients. Statistical analysis of the resulting pattern classes yields a library of signal "building blocks", which are useful for detailed characterization of transients inherent to the signals being analyzed.

Poly (ADP-ribose) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

  • Lee, Yunjong;Kang, Ho Chul;Lee, Byoung Dae;Lee, Yun-Il;Kim, Young Pil;Shin, Joo-Ho
    • BMB Reports
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    • v.47 no.8
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    • pp.424-432
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    • 2014
  • The defining feature of Parkinson's disease is a progressive and selective demise of dopaminergic neurons. A recent report on Parkinson's disease animal model demonstrates that poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) dependent cell death, also named parthanatos, is accountable for selective dopaminergic neuronal loss. Parthanatos is a programmed necrotic cell death, characterized by PARP1 activation, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation, and large scale DNA fragmentation. Besides cell death regulation via interaction with AIF, PAR molecule mediates diverse cellular processes including genomic stability, cell division, transcription, epigenetic regulation, and stress granule formation. In this review, we will discuss the roles of PARP1 activation and PAR molecules in the pathological processes of Parkinson's disease. Potential interaction between PAR molecule and Parkinson's disease protein interactome are briefly introduced. Finally, we suggest promising points of therapeutic intervention in the pathological PAR signaling cascade to halt progression in Parkinson's disease.

Employers' Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence among a Diverse Workforce

  • Samuel, Laura J.;Tudor, Carrie;Weinstein, Marc;Moss, Helen;Glass, Nancy
    • Safety and Health at Work
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    • v.2 no.3
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    • pp.250-259
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    • 2011
  • Objectives: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant global public health concern, affecting 5.3 million US individuals annually. An estimated 1 in 3 women globally are abused by an intimate partner in their lifetime, and the effects carry over into the workplace. This article examines employers' perceptions of IPV in the workplace, targeting supervisors of Latina employees. Methods: Fourteen employers and supervisors of small service-sector companies in Oregon were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Interpretive description was used to identify themes. These qualitative interviews preceded and helped to formulate a larger workplace intervention study. Results: The following themes were found and are detailed: (1) factors associated with recognizing IPV in the workplace, (2) effects of IPV on the work environment and (3) supervisors' responses to IPV-active vs. passive involvement. Also, supervisors' suggestions for addressing IPV in the workplace are summarized. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the need for more IPV-related resources in the workplace to be available to supervisors as well as survivors and their coworkers. The needs of supervisors and workplaces vary by site, demonstrating the need for tailored interventions, and culturally appropriate workplace interventions are needed for Latinas and other racially and ethnically diverse populations.

Evidence of Multimeric Forms of HSP70 with Phosphorylation on Serine and Tyrosine Residues - Implications for Roles of HSP70 in Detection of GI Cancers

  • Dutta, Anand;Girotra, Mohit;Merchant, Nipun;Nair, Padmanabhan;Dutta, Sudhir Kumar
    • Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
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    • v.14 no.10
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    • pp.5741-5745
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    • 2013
  • Background: Heat-shock protein70 (HSP70) are intracellular protein chaperones, with emerging evidence of their association with various diseases. We have previously reported significantly elevated plasma-HSP70 (pHSP70) in pancreatic cancer. Current methods of pHSP70 isolation are ELISA-based which lack specificity due to cross-reactivity by similarities in the amino-acid sequence in regions of the protein backbone resulting in overestimated HSP70 value. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken to develop a methodology to capture all isoforms of pHSP70, while further defining their tyrosine and serine phosphorylation status. Results: The methodology included gel electrophoresis on centrifuged supernatant obtained from plasma incubated with HSP70 antibody-coupled beads. After blocking non-specific binding sites, blots were immunostained with monoclonal-antibody specific for human-HSP70, phosphoserine and phosphotyrosine. Conclusions: Our novel immunocapture approach has distinct advantages over the commercially available methods of pHSP70 quantification by allowing isolation of molecular aggregates of HSP70 with additional ability to precisely distinguish phosphorylation state of HSP70 molecules at serine and tyrosine residues.