The Study of Anticipatory Postural Adjustments in Voluntary Arm and Leg Movement

수의적인 상·하지 움직임 동안의 체간의 선행적 자세조절 연구

  • Jung, Kyoung-Sim (Dept. of Physical Therapy, The Graduate School, Sahmyook University) ;
  • Shin, Won-Seob (Dept. of Physical Therapy, The Graduate School, Sahmyook University) ;
  • Chung, Yi-Jung (Dept. of Physical Therapy, College of Health Welfare, Sahmyook University)
  • 정경심 (삼육대학교 대학원 물리치료학과) ;
  • 신원섭 (삼육대학교 대학원 물리치료학과) ;
  • 정이정 (삼육대학교 보건복지대학 물리치료학과)
  • Received : 2008.02.16
  • Accepted : 2008.04.30
  • Published : 2008.05.21

Abstract

Anticipatory postural adjustments are pre-planned by the central nervous system (CNS) before the activation of agonist muscles in the limbs, and minimize postural sway. Most previous studies on this topic have focused on upper-limb movement, and little research has been conducted on lower-limb movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the recruitment order of left and right trunk muscles during limb movement. Fifteen healthy subjects (10 male, 5 female) were enrolled. Electro-myographic signals were recorded on the muscles of: (1) deltoid, lumbar erector spinae, latissimus dorsi and internal oblique during shoulder flexion, (2) rectus femoris, rectus abdominis, external oblique and internal oblique during hip flexion. During right upper limb flexion, the onset of left erector spinae muscle and left internal oblique muscle activity preceded the onset of right deltoid by 8.09 ms and 19.83 ms, respectively. But these differences were not significant (p>.05). A similar sequence of activation occurred with lower limb flexion. The onset of left internal oblique muscle activity preceded the onset of right rectus femoris muscle by 28.29 ms (p<.05). The onset of right internal oblique muscle activity preceded the onset of left rectus femoris muscles by 23.24 ms (p<.05). The internal oblique muscle was the first activated during limb movement. Our study established the recruitment order of trunk muscles during limb movement, and explained the postural control strategy of the trunk muscles in healthy people. We expect that this study will be used to evaluate patients with an asymmetric recruitment order of muscle activation due to impaired CNS.