The Effect of Attentional Focus on the Performance of Dual Task

집중방식이 이중과제 수행에 미치는 영향

  • Roh, Jung-Suk (Dept. of Physical Therapy, Hanseo University) ;
  • Yi, Chung-Hwi (Dept. of Physical Therapy, College of Health Science, Yonsei University) ;
  • Cho, Sang-Hyun (Dept. of Physical Therapy, College of Health Science, Yonsei University) ;
  • Jeon, Hye-Seon (Dept. of Physical Therapy, College of Health Science, Yonsei University) ;
  • Kwon, Hyuk-Cheol (Dept. of Rehabilitation Technology, Daegu University) ;
  • Kim, Tack-Hoon (Dept. of Physical Therapy, Hanseo University)
  • 노정석 (한서대학교 물리치료학과) ;
  • 이충휘 (연세대학교 보건과학대학 물리치료학과) ;
  • 조상현 (연세대학교 보건과학대학 물리치료학과) ;
  • 전혜선 (연세대학교 보건과학대학 물리치료학과) ;
  • 권혁철 (대구대학교 재활과학대학 재활공학과) ;
  • 김택훈 (한서대학교 물리치료학과)
  • Received : 2008.02.02
  • Accepted : 2008.04.10
  • Published : 2008.05.21

Abstract

Studies of attentional focus effects, have shown that the performer's attentional focus plays an important role in the performance and learning of motor tasks. We examined the influence of attentional focus on the performance of dual tasks (a postural task and a suprapostural task) and used electromyography (EMG) to examine whether the differences between external and internal focus were also manifest at the neuromuscular level. The subjects (n=40) stood on a balance board (postural task) and held a bar horizontally (suprapostural task). All of the subjects performed under different attentional focus conditions: external (balancer on balance board) or internal (feet) focus on the postural task, and external (balancer on bar) or internal (hand) focus on the suprapostural task. The mean displacement velocity of the bar and the percent reference voluntary contraction (%RVC) of the biceps brachii were reduced when the subjects adopted an external focus on the suprapostural task (p<.05). In addition, the mean displacement velocity of the balance board and %RVC of the tibialis anterior were reduced when the subjects adopted an external focus on the postural task (p<.05). When the subjects adopted an external focus on the suprapostural task, the mean displacement velocity of the balance board and %RVC of the tibialis anterior were also reduced (p<.05). When the subjects' attentional focus was on the postural task, there were no differences in the mean displacement and %RVC of the biceps brachii between attentional focuses. The performance of each task was enhanced when subjects focused on the respective task. The suprapostural task goals had a stronger influence on postural control than vice versa. These results reflect the propensity of the motor system to optimize control processes based on the environmental outcome, or movement effect, that the performer wants to achieve.